Should You Renovate Your Home During the COVID-19 Pandemic? It Depends.

11

The spread and devastation of COVID-19 has certainly forced people to rearrange their lives as they practice social distancing and social isolation.

Yet, so many people are struggling to retain some normalcy in their lives and fill the time with meaningful activities.

Since you’re stuck in your home or an undetermined amount of time, you may be tempted to take on some home improvement projects.

While this is a great way to pass the time in a productive manner, there are some things you should consider before jumping into a home renovation project:

What Can You Afford?

No one can predict exactly how badly COVID-19 is going to affect the economy but, if we do experience a recession – or even a depression, you may need to rely on any money you bring in or save.
Thankfully, some renovations are less expensive than others. A low-cost project you can easily pay for out of your pocket could do some good in this time of social isolation. It may be just the project you need to pass the time.

However, more expensive projects should probably be put off. You want to be careful not to part with huge chunks of cash, dip into savings or borrow money. When thinking about embarking on a renovation project, consider whether or not you can survive financially should you find yourself out of work. Remember, there will still be bills to pay and basics to purchase.

In the end, as long as you feel comfortable parting with some money to complete a project, you may benefit from getting some work done around your home.

Can You Renovate While Practicing Social Isolation?

Renovations involve not only planning but the purchasing of materials and the potential need to buy or rent equipment. Also, you need to consider whether or not you can complete the project on your own or if you’ll need a professional to come in and do some of the work. If so, you’ll have to wait until social isolation has been lifted.

Even though hardware stores are currently being considered an essential service and remain open, that doesn’t mean there is no risk to visiting stores and making purchases. In order to do so safely, be sure to wash your hands as soon as you get home or sanitize them while out and about. Wipe down any materials or equipment with a disinfectant before using. Lastly, be sure to stay at least 6 feet away from store employees and other shoppers.

Going out and shopping, while following the above guidelines, is still a low-risk activity. However, if you or someone in home has health issues that makes them vulnerable, you should consider simply staying home.

What Can You Do Instead?

If you have decided that tackling renovations in your home is not a good idea at the moment, what can you do to make use of your free time and improve your home? Think about the repairs that need to be done around your home. Maybe there’s a leaky pipe you’ve been putting off or a hole in the wall that needs patching.

It may be more to your benefit to address these issues since, due to the potential downswing of the economy, you may not have the resources to do them later.

Comments are closed.